As part of the Cowen Institute’s ongoing efforts to provide the New Orleans community with information and resources throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, this interactive map shows testing and food resources in Orleans parish.

This new map displays both COVID-19 testing and food resources in Orleans Parish. It was compiled by Margaret Kassel, a Tulane University student and intern at the Cowen Institute this past semester.

With the Category filter, you can modify your search depending on your needs. Using the “Days of Operation” filter, you can select resources by day of the week. …


Ahead of the election on November 3, we created an interactive map of all districts and candidates for the Orleans Parish School Board election. Click on your district to see a list of candidates and websites.

Click here to start exploring the map!


This morning, the Cowen Institute’s Policy Director, Vincent Rossmeier, joined WBOK’s “The Good Morning Show” with host Oliver Thomas to discuss our “Life After High School” report from last year. The hour long conversation featured a conversation about the economic and educational outlook for public high school graduates in New Orleans.

You can listen to the full discussion here.


Following the onset of the global COVID-19 pandemic, a number of universities, school districts, public bodies, and private organizations began gauging the pandemic’s possible impact on potential and current college students. The Cowen Institute reviewed 45 surveys of college students about the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on their lives. The reviewed surveys were released between March 19th and June 17th of 2020 and covered a range of topics including college enrollment, online learning, financial circumstances, mental and physical health, and school support.

This is the first in a series of posts summarizing the findings from these surveys. This post includes results from all 29 surveys reviewed that have survey questions related to college enrollment and online learning.


Image for post
Image for post

This is the 14th in a series of interviews and Q&As conducted by the Cowen Institute with New Orleans educators to highlight how schools and programs are managing with the current COVID-19 outbreak.

In this edited Q&A, we continue our updates on how schools in New Orleans are responding to the COVID crisis. This is an interview with Kate Mehok of the School Leaders Forum and Crescent City Schools, a Charter Management Organization that operates three schools in the city.

Can you explain your role at Crescent City Schools, as well as your work with other CMO and school leaders?

I am the co-founder and CEO of Crescent City Schools. We serve 2500 students across three PreK-8th grade charter schools. I am also the president of the School Leaders Forum.

We wanted to focus this Q&A on the re-opening of schools this fall. So firstly, will all schools be required to reopen in the fall?


Image for post
Image for post

Last week, the Louisiana Department of Education (LDOE) released “Strong Start 2020”, a resource document with guidelines for K-12 public and private schools across the state about how to re-open as safely as possible this fall. The guidelines were created in conjunction with the Louisiana Department of Health and are structured around the different phases of re-opening that the state can progress through in response to the COVID pandemic. The document includes a list of best practices and a re-opening checklist as resources for schools.

Importantly, the document offers recommended guidance to schools about how to re-open, but does not include requirements schools must follow. Based on the document, it is clear that districts and schools will have a great deal of autonomy in what guidance they actually follow and what precautions they take. To this point, in the introduction to the plan, new state LDOE Superintendent Cade Brumley writes that, “This is not a one-size-fits-all approach. We know there are vast differences between schools, systems, and communities across the state. It’s our responsibility to develop guidance in conjunction with public health officials, then allow local leadership to make decisions based on the unique needs in their community.” This means that at this time, the LDOE is not intending to mandate schools follow certain protocols, which mirrors the bottom-up approach of the federal government to COVID, in which cities and states have all enacted a wide array of responses and restrictions (or lack thereof) to the crisis. …


Image for post
Image for post

The COVID-19 pandemic has radically altered almost every facet of American society — including higher education. Most college, university, and community college campuses closed early this spring to try to help limit the spread of the virus and to keep their students, faculty, and staff safe. Many moved courses online to allow students to finish the semester.

Now, as the number of COVID cases nationwide has remained steady, and even climbed in some states, higher education institutions are in the process of disseminating their plans for the fall. …


In this edited Q&A, we continue our updates on how youth-focused programs in New Orleans are responding to the COVID crisis. This is an interview with Dr. James Dabney, Director of The Posse Foundation, New Orleans. The Posse Foundation partners with colleges and universities to provide young people with full-tuition leadership scholarships.

Image for post
Image for post

This is the 11th in a series of interviews and Q&As conducted by the Cowen Institute with New Orleans educators to highlight how schools and programs are managing with the current COVID-19 outbreak.

In this edited Q&A, we continue our updates on how youth-focused programs in New Orleans are responding to the COVID crisis. This is an interview with Darrin McCall, Director Programs at the Youth Empowerment Project (YEP). YEP operates ten programs across six sites that help to address the needs of vulnerable youth, through education, enrichment, and employment-readiness offerings.

Image for post
Image for post

Cowen: How are you communicating with students, YEP participants, and families since quarantining began?

McCall: Staff for each of YEP’s four service areas (YEP Educates, YEP Enriches, YEP Mentors, YEP Works) are communicating with participants by phone and through video calling (like Zoom, FaceTime and Google hangouts). Initially, most of the communication was to stay connected with families and help direct them to many of the community resources that were popping up in the first few weeks of the stay at home order, but our team very quickly adapted our service delivery to begin to engage youth in a variety of virtual programming. …


This is the 10th in a series of interviews and Q&As conducted by the Cowen Institute with New Orleans educators to highlight how schools and programs are managing with the current COVID-19 outbreak.

In this edited Q&A, we continue our updates on how the programs at the Cowen Institute are responding to the COVID crisis. This is an interview with April Rice, the Director of Upward Bound, a college-readiness and completion program at the Cowen Institute.

Image for post
Image for post

For those who are unfamiliar, can you describe your program and the services that you provide, as well as the number of individuals that you serve?

Tulane University’s Upward Bound, a college-readiness and completion program at the Cowen Institute, offers high impact, high quality supplemental college-readiness support to more than 100 first-generation students from low-income backgrounds in New Orleans each year. …

About

Cowen Institute

The mission of the Cowen Institute is to advance public education and youth success in New Orleans and beyond.

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store